The expansive Virginia resort affords the option of doing a lot or a little.

Preserving the beauty of Primland’s 12,000 acres is a priority; the property became LEED certified in 2012.

Preserving the beauty of Primland’s 12,000 acres is a priority; the property became LEED certified in 2012.

I gunned the gas, and we plowed over the bubbling creek and roared up the muddy, rocky bank on the other side, grins plastered on our faces as we continued our rollicking RTV tour of the wooded trails of the Primland resort in southwest Virginia. I happily released my inner speed demon on this fun vehicle, a cross between a golf cart and an ATV. Our guided tour took us along paths covering just a small portion of the 12,000 acres of this luxury mountain resort, roughly the size of Bermuda.

The three treehouses have private decks and stellar views of Kibler Valley.

The three treehouses have private decks and stellar views of Kibler Valley.

My adrenaline levels during our stay at Primland mirrored the peaks and valleys of the surrounding Blue Ridge range—soaring during our rugged ride and then plunging to a Zen-like state during a soothing massage at the spa.

Other adrenaline-raising activities at the resort include mountain biking, horseback riding, disc golf, clay shooting, tomahawk tossing, tennis and kayaking. Hunting is popular, too, and Primland, an Orvis-endorsed wing shooting lodge, specializes in pheasant hunting and European style shoots. (Yes, it’s like Downton Abbey, right down to the tweed attire.) Golfing on the mountaintop course is a favorite pursuit, as is fishing on a 6-mile stretch of the Dan River.

On the lower levels of the adrenaline scale are yoga classes, moonshine tastings, hiking, geocaching and forest bathing, the latter a Japanese term for a healing walk through the woods, which at Primland includes guided meditations followed by yoga on the yoga deck.

Guests can explore the vast night sky at the Observatory Dome.

Guests can explore the vast night sky at the Observatory Dome.

Other low-key activities feature sitting by the fireplace in the Lodge’s great hall or at the outdoor fire pit, toasting marshmallows and enjoying the complimentary nightly s’mores. Also spectacular is a visit to the Observatory Dome, housed in a silo-like structure that’s part of the main lodge. Guests can sign up for a 45-minute program that includes a tour of the night sky and a viewing of the stars through a 14-inch telescope.

But the views don’t stop there. Every restaurant at Primland includes a panorama of the mountains. Lunch and a casual dinner are served at the 19th Pub, which serves items such as fried catfish, burgers, sandwiches and shrimp and grits. Breakfast is in the Elements dining room, which at night is the option for fine dining. Stables Saloon, located a short drive away, is open seasonally for breakfast and family-style dinners, with live bluegrass music. Our accommodations were in a spacious suite in The Lodge, which has 26 guest rooms and suites. Ours had a separate living room and a bedroom that was so comfortable we slept 10 hours one night. Other accommodations within walking distance include cottages with private decks and stone fireplaces, and mountain homes of various sizes. For more secluded lodging, try the treehouses that are open from March to October. The property has a total of 51 guest rooms, and every accommodation has a Blue Ridge view.

In our everyday lives, we often feel like we’re struggling to move mountains. At Primland, one can enjoy them right where they are.

PRIMLAND
276.222.3800
primland.com

STORY: Jan Schroder